Health and beauty resources online.

THE OTHER SIDE OF SLEEP: FREUD AND DREAMS

December 18th, 2010

In modern times the renewed argument over the function of dreams was triggered primarily by the pioneering work of Sigmund Freud, whose The Interpretation of Dreams was published in 1900. Freud considered dreams to be a special language of the mind, one in which repressed sexual desires arising from our childhood relationships with our parents are expressed, and therefore fulfilled, in symbolic fashion. Dreams thus serve as a form of safety valve through which we may discharge mental and emotional conflict; yet dreams protect our psyches (and our sleep) by disguising the wish in such a way as to prevent us from waking with feelings of shame, guilt, or alarm.
Dreams, said Freud, operate on two levels of meaning: the “manifest” level, made up of the specific images and details as reported by the dreamer, and the “latent” level, containing all the hidden associations and meanings that can be revealed and interpreted only through the process of careful, thorough psychoanalysis. The events depicted in dreams are drawn from actual events that occurred while the dreamer was awake; these events are somehow selected for inclusion by the dreaming mind because they can be connected or associated in some way with events or complexes buried deep within the psyche. Before appearing in the dream, however, the events undergo a process called dream work, involving some kind of transformation or censorship so that their true, and presumably horrifying, nature is disguised from our conscious perception. As his work progressed, Freud became convinced that certain symbols or themes that appeared in a dream held special meaning for the individual dreamer, and that an understanding of the associations each person makes with the symbols was required in order to grasp the significance of the dream. Thus, in the process of analysis, the dreamer is asked to associate freely on the various elements of the dream and their possible connection to other events in the past. Wrote Freud, “The interpretation of dreams is in fact the royal road to a knowledge of the unconscious.”
Interestingly, although much of Freud’s work was devoted to the study of the important revelations that he perceived in his patients’ dreams, he believed that a sleep without dreams is the best—indeed, the only—desirable kind of sleep. Subsequent developments in the field of psychiatry departed from this view. For example, Carl Jung, a student and onetime disciple of Freud, held that dreams revealed not just the root of the neurosis but its prognosis and treatment as well. For Jung, dreams contained the whole range of human experience since the race began— everything from fantasy, memory, and foresight to telepathic insights and glimpses of transcendental truths.
*285\226\8*

THE OTHER SIDE OF SLEEP: FREUD AND DREAMSIn modern times the renewed argument over the function of dreams was triggered primarily by the pioneering work of Sigmund Freud, whose The Interpretation of Dreams was published in 1900. Freud considered dreams to be a special language of the mind, one in which repressed sexual desires arising from our childhood relationships with our parents are expressed, and therefore fulfilled, in symbolic fashion. Dreams thus serve as a form of safety valve through which we may discharge mental and emotional conflict; yet dreams protect our psyches (and our sleep) by disguising the wish in such a way as to prevent us from waking with feelings of shame, guilt, or alarm.Dreams, said Freud, operate on two levels of meaning: the “manifest” level, made up of the specific images and details as reported by the dreamer, and the “latent” level, containing all the hidden associations and meanings that can be revealed and interpreted only through the process of careful, thorough psychoanalysis. The events depicted in dreams are drawn from actual events that occurred while the dreamer was awake; these events are somehow selected for inclusion by the dreaming mind because they can be connected or associated in some way with events or complexes buried deep within the psyche. Before appearing in the dream, however, the events undergo a process called dream work, involving some kind of transformation or censorship so that their true, and presumably horrifying, nature is disguised from our conscious perception. As his work progressed, Freud became convinced that certain symbols or themes that appeared in a dream held special meaning for the individual dreamer, and that an understanding of the associations each person makes with the symbols was required in order to grasp the significance of the dream. Thus, in the process of analysis, the dreamer is asked to associate freely on the various elements of the dream and their possible connection to other events in the past. Wrote Freud, “The interpretation of dreams is in fact the royal road to a knowledge of the unconscious.”Interestingly, although much of Freud’s work was devoted to the study of the important revelations that he perceived in his patients’ dreams, he believed that a sleep without dreams is the best—indeed, the only—desirable kind of sleep. Subsequent developments in the field of psychiatry departed from this view. For example, Carl Jung, a student and onetime disciple of Freud, held that dreams revealed not just the root of the neurosis but its prognosis and treatment as well. For Jung, dreams contained the whole range of human experience since the race began— everything from fantasy, memory, and foresight to telepathic insights and glimpses of transcendental truths.*285\226\8*

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (RA) AND DISABILITY: SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY INSURANCE BENEFITS AND MORE

December 12th, 2010

Social Security disability insurance benefits. DIB are funded through FICA taxes paid by both employees and employers. You may be eligible if you meet the disability standards. You and certain members of your family may qualify for DIB if: • you have sufficient work credits (determined by your length of employment, how recently you have worked, and the age at which you became disabled) or • you are not engaged in substantial gainful activity Read More...

CHLAMYDIA AND NON¬GONOCOCCAL URETHRITIS AND CERVICITIS – CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS 2

October 12th, 2010

NGC may present as a vaginal discharge, as symptoms of urethritis or as low abdominal pain. Most women with NGC present as the symptom-free partners of men with NGU. Speculum examination may reveal a cervical discharge with or without an inflamed cervix. The cervix may appear normal. The most important complication of NGC is the spread to the upper genital tract to cause endometritis, salpingitis and PID Read More...

CHLAMYDIA AND NON GONOCOCCAL URETHRITIS AND CERVICITIS – CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS

October 12th, 2010

The incubation period for chlamydial NGU and NGC is usually 1 to 2 weeks, but varies from a few days to several weeks. These infections are commonly asymptomatic, 3 to 10% of sexually active adults having unsuspected chlamydial infection. Longstanding silent infection may be activated by a triggering factor such as acute gonorrhoea NGU may present with urethral discharge, itchiness, tingling and dysuria Read More...

SEX AND GETTING OLDER: ERECTILE DIFFICULTIES

December 29th, 2009

If you are prepared to experiment a bit, you can work out different techniques that can satisfy both partners. Remember, a man doesn't need an erection to be able to ejaculate or orgasm. The cause of erection difficulties might be psychological or reversible. Apart from diabetes or disease in the blood vessels, there are many other things which can affect your ability to get an erection Read More...

SEX AND GITTING OLDER: CHRONIC MEDICAL PROBLEM

December 29th, 2009

As you get older, developing a chronic medical problem gets more likely. Some of these conditions can interfere with sexuality, particularly untreated diabetes in men. (Diabetes doesn't seem to affect women's sexual responses, except that women with diabetes are more likely to get recurrent vaginal thrush Read More...

ALLERGIC REACTIONS: HYPERACTIVITY

December 29th, 2009

Hyperactivity is the everyday term for what medical books refer to as 'attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity'. While there are over 100 possible symptoms of hyperactivity, children with the problem are generally restless, impulsive and agitated. Their attention spans are often so short that they turn from one task to another without completing any Read More...

COLDS – FOODS THAT BUILD UP RESISTANCE TO COLDS

December 29th, 2009

Foods rich in calcium should be on your menu without fail. Eat carrots every day. Include kohlrabi (turnip cabbage) tops in your diet when they are in season; serve similar vegetables where kohlrabi is not grown. Celery leaves and roots (celeriac), white turnips, swedes, parsnips and the like are also good because of their high calcium content Read More...

COLDS – DURING A CHANGE OF SEASON 3

December 29th, 2009

You can see that it is not at all surprising that we need to be much more careful during the change of seasons than in the depths of winter, since we become chilled much more quickly when the body is still attuned to the warmth of sunny autumn days. Therefore, do not be tempted to sit down to your work in the morning without having taken some vigorous exercise previously Read More...

SEX AND GETTING OLDER: ISN’T SEX IMPORTANT?

December 29th, 2009

Old age is a time of life that is poorly understood by the young and in many respects feared. It is viewed by many as a very negative phase of life; a time of loss and grieving ... for youth, for agility, for missed opportunities, for a spouse or friends who have died, and of facing the inevitability of your own death Read More...